Grab Your Pitchforks And Let The Crop Mob Begin!


Do you remember what you were doing on April 22, 2009? Perhaps you do -- this was the day that Carrot Mob first launched in Seattle. During that day, Pike Pub & Brewery put 25 percent of all sales back into providing a mini-energy retrofit for the location.

A great idea -- a mob of people coming together for the collective good. So why isn’t that concept applied elsewhere?

Well, time has now come to introduce Crop Mob - a group of young, nomadic farmers who partner with local, sustainable farms for a days worth of volunteer efforts.

According to Cropmob.org:

“Crop mob is primarily a group of young, landless, and wannabe farmers who come together to build and empower communities by working side by side.  Crop mob is also a group of experienced farmers and gardeners willing to share their knowledge with their peers and the next generation of agrarians.  The membership is dynamic, changing and growing with each new mob event.”

In four days since the New York Times coverage of a Crop Mob event at Okfuskee Farm in Silk Hope, North Carolina, social media outlets have been blowing up with coverage. A recent twitter post, for example, highlights the success of the mob, and the eagerness by folks to get back in touch with the land: Holy Cow! 90+ rsvps for edible earthscapes mob tomorrow.

And thanks to the original mobsters, other cities such as Seattle, Atlanta and Madison now have a central online presence to connect wannabe mobsters with volunteer opportunities on local farms.

What is great about this effort lies in the connections being made between those involved. Farms receive extra hands to help out in the fields, and volunteers take away knowledge on sustainable farming practices. With the average age of today’s farmer on the rise, crop mobs exemplify simple, unique ways to help on ways to diversify the field of agriculture by intimately involving the next generation of farmers.

Photo credit: Flickr/heacphotos, Creative Commons license.

Comments

Congratulations on Seattle Crop Mob. Here's my dispatch from the amazing Mob we had in North Carolina on Sunday.

The Crop Mob made us an offer we couldn't refuse: help us build rice paddies in the mud, eat good grub, make friends. http://bit.ly/dp1oWj

Posted by: Dee on March 2, 2010 7:06 PM

I'm a mobber in the Chapel Hill, NC area and just wanted to say I'm so excited to see the mob is catching on. Kudos to organizers and mobbers recently forming all over the US. Keep it up!

Posted by: Stephanie on March 3, 2010 4:19 PM

Hello I'm Clint Sidney and I am also a gardening enthusiast.The Crop Mob was really great and I love what they are doing. This will not only help our farmers but also Mother Nature as well. I also love to share information about Organic Garden

Posted by: Clint Sidney on April 26, 2010 12:38 AM


Made this website to promote actual change that could start today in the world. But like all great idea's it needs people at it's base of concern. So if you would swing by and give it a look. I would really appreciate it because I made it for You. Thanks, Quinton

Posted by: Quinton on July 28, 2010 2:54 PM

I am very happy to see this movement growing. It is very necessary.

Posted by: Sports Monitor on August 14, 2010 7:36 AM

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